Beer 35

Beer 35
For 5 gallons – 40 pints

Used mash tun. Strike temp 77.
Mash for 90 minutes. Batch sparged, 2x batches. Total extracted wort – 4 gallons, 32 pints. Boiled with this then made up with cold to 40 pints in fermenter.

Used hop bags for all hops.

Fermentable Colour lb: oz Grams Ratio
Pale Malt 5 EBC 10 lbs. 11.7 oz 4870 grams 80%
Munich Malt 20 EBC 1 lbs. 5.4 oz 605 grams 10%
Crystal Malt 130 EBC 1 lbs. 5.4 oz 605 grams 10%

 

Hop Variety Type Alpha Time lb: oz grams Ratio
Ella Pellet 15 % 60 mins 0 lbs. 0.6 oz 18 grams 13.8%
Centennial Whole 11 % 10 mins 0 lbs. 0.9 oz 25 grams 19.2%
Amarillo Whole 10.1 % 10 mins 0 lbs. 0.9 oz 25 grams 19.2%
Centennial Whole 11 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.7 oz 20 grams 15.4%
Amarillo Whole 10.1 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.7 oz 20 grams 15.4%
Amarillo – Hop Tea Pellet 10.1 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.8 oz 22 grams 16.9%

 

Final Volume: 23 Litres
Original Gravity: 1.051
Final Gravity: 1.012
Alcohol Content: 5.1% ABV
Total Liquor: 34.4 Litres
Mash Liquor: 15.2 Litres
Mash Efficiency: 65 %
Bitterness: 45.9424785366538 EBU
Colour: 33 EBC

Beer 34 – Full Mash 3

Beer 34
For 5 gallons – 40 pints

Used borrowed ‘mash tun’. Strike temp 77.
Mash for 90 minutes. Batch sparged, 2x batches. Total extracted wort – 4 gallons, 32 pints. Boiled with this then made up with cold to 40 pints in fermenter.

Used hop bags for all hops.

Boil – Thr 9th Jan 2013

Fermentable Colour lb: oz Grams Ratio
Pale Malt 5 EBC 11 lbs. 0.4 oz 5000 grams 100%

 

Hop Variety Type Alpha Time lb: oz grams Ratio
Citra Whole 14.6 % 90 mins 0 lbs. 0.8 oz 22 grams 21.2%
Cascade Whole 4.6 % 10 mins 0 lbs. 0.6 oz 16 grams 15.4%
Citra Whole 14.6 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.6 oz 16 grams 15.4%
Amarillo – Dry Hop (After primary Ferm) Pellet 10.1 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.4 oz 10 grams 9.6%
Summer – Dry Hop (After primary ferm Pellet 6 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.7 oz 20 grams 19.2%
Amarillo – Hop Tea (After sec ferm) Pellet 10.1 % 0 mins 0 lbs. 0.7 oz 20 grams 19.2%

 

Final Volume: 23 Litres
Original Gravity: 1.049  
Final Gravity: 1.011  
Alcohol Content: 4.9% ABV
Total Liquor: 33.3 Litres
Mash Liquor: 12.5 Litres
Mash Efficiency: 75 %
Bitterness: 37.5437929190751 EBU
Colour: 8 EBC

Beer 31 – Full Mash

Beer 31
For 32 pints (3 gallons after boil)

32 pints water of water
2.5Kg pale malt (crushed)

200g dark brown sugar

12g Citra (14.6% AA) (90 mins)
4g seaweed (70 mins)
8g Cascade (4.6% AA) (80 mins)
8g Cascade (4.6% AA) (0 mins @ 80C)

Did a ‘boil in the bag mash’. As I’m a tramp I used argricultural fleece for the bag. Fine as long as the bad doesn’t touch the bottom of the stainless steel container I used for heating. Then it melts

Anyway:

Bag in from start.
Heated to 66C then kept temperature around this value for 75 minutes moving the bag around
Heated to 77C before removing and squeezing grain bag.

Then proceeded like other recipes

Used hop bags for all hops.

Fermented in separate vessel to mash – attempt to reduce oxygen contact after fermentation is complete

SG before fermentation – 1.045 (note that I thought it was significantly less but it was affected by heat)
//*SG after fermentation ~
Boil – Thr 08th Nov 2012
Primary Fermentation End – Thr 15th Nov 2012
Secondary Fermentation End – Thr 29th Nov 2012
Added cascade hop pellets approx 6g per 8gl vessel- 18g at start of secondary fermentation

Attempting 32 IBU

32*10*15/(14.6×26.8) ~ 12g citra hops

Beer 33 – Full Mash 2

Beer 32
For 32 pints (4 gallons mash & boil, makes 24 pints of beer)

32 pints water of water
3kg pale malt (crushed)
200g dark brown sugar

14g Citra (14.6% AA) (60 mins)
4g seaweed (50 mins)
10g Cascade (4.6% AA) (50 mins)
8g Citra (4.6% AA) (0 mins @ 80C)

Did a ‘boil in the bag mash’. Strike temp 77

Anyway:

Bag in at 75C.
Heated to 66C then kept temperature around this value for 75 minutes moving the bag around
Heated to 77C before removing and NOT squeezing grain bag. Let water drain from bag by gravity

Then proceeded like other recipes

Used hop bags for all hops.

Fermented in separate vessel to mash – attempt to reduce oxygen contact after fermentation is complete. By the time beer gets to fermentation stage have only 24 pints.

SG before fermentation –
//*SG after fermentation ~
Boil – Tues 4th Dec 2012
Primary Fermentation End –
Secondary Fermentation End –

Made a ‘hop tea’ with 12g Cascade hop leaf, addded after 7 days secondary fermentation.

Beer in King Keg, not bottled.

Attempting 37 IBU

Beer 32 – Christmas 2012

Beer 32
For 32 pints (4 gallons)

32 pints water of water
2Kg pale malt (crushed)
1Kg Crystal malt (crushed)
0.5Kg Pale spray malt

300g Golden Syrup – added in last 10 mins of boil

42g Cascade  (14.6% AA) (60 mins)
10g Cascade (14.6% AA) (30 mins)
10g Cascade (14.6% AA) (20 mins)
4g seaweed (20 mins)
10g Cascade (14.6% AA) (10 mins)

‘Boil in the bag mash’. Squeezed bag. Need to sort out a better way of doing this.

Anyway:

Bag in @70C
Heated to 66C then kept temperature around this value for 90 minutes moving the bag around

Then proceeded like other recipes

Used hop bags for all hops.

Fermented in separate vessel to mash – attempt to reduce oxygen contact after fermentation is complete

SG before fermentation – 1.045 (note that I thought it was significantly less but it was affected by heat)
//*SG after fermentation ~
Boil – Thr 15th Nov 2012
Primary Fermentation End – Wed 21st nov

Wed 21st nov – Didn’t take off yeast. Added massive 32g of old cascade hop tea.

Attempting 39 IBU with 5.2%

Dahlias

I’d forgotton that I’d ordered some Dahlias before Christmas. The postman dropped them on the mat this morning. Very exciting, even if I couldn’t remember exactly what I actually did order. When I opened the packet I discovered three dried tubers. These have the appearance of something you might not want to pick up from the park. I thought back to the conversation I had with the mail order company just after Christmas, the chap I spoke to seemed surprised that I wanted to order tubers rather than cuttings especially after I informed him that I’d never grown them before. Oh dear, I suppose I can understand what he was worried about. Its a bit like me giving away my tomato plants to relatives – my grandma always tells me that my mum is ‘not very good with houseplants’. By this she is very politely saying that my mother has killed every plant that she has ever given her to the extent that she buys me plants rather than my mum (ho, ho, ho). Well if the nursery man reads this I can assure him that I’ll do my best to make sure that his tubers florish.

My trawling around the internet didn’t give me as much information as I would haved liked. There was a lot of information about planting dahlia cuttings and chucking the tubers into the ground but not too much about planting the tubers for taking cuttings. Broadly speaking it was something like:

  • Do it in February, indoors
  • Put them in damp potting compost but leave a bit of the tuber above the surface
  • Take cuttings when there are 2 notches(joints) on the shoots
  • Don’t plant the cuttings (or tubers) outside until all signs of frost has gone

So I planted my 3 tubers in damp compost inside. Hopefully I’ve done the right thing. Heres the result:

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Kind of reminds me of a ‘turd on the beach’. If I was a modern artist I’m sure I could make good money out of these photographs – especially once they start producing shoots. Wonder what the critics would make of the gingham on the table?

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This is plot 1, where some of these dahlias will end up at the end of may

This is plot 2, where some more dahias will be planted.


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I wanted to get a before and after picture. This is the before, I cleared some space, turned the soil and dug some compost in.

Rasperries – In the bleak midwinter…..

I’m new to rasperries. We inherited a few rasperry bushes when we moved into this place and the few bushes that we have produced a huge amount of fruit at the end of last summer. Fab!

I’m completely converted, rasperries seem pretty easy. I thought I’d follow their development this year to get an idea of what they do.

This is the south facing fence which they grow along. There is a gap in the middle because I removed a 1m section of plants as they didn’t produce anything at all. I thought I’d fill this with a cougette and then plant some more rasperries at the end of the season. At the moment there is a plastic sheet over the ground and I’ve dug in quite a large quantity of compost. I’ve also covered the ground around the rasperry stems with leaf mould/compost to keep the weeds at bay.

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We have a very clay soil. Rasperries (so I’ve read) will grow in most soil types but they don’t like waterlogged roots during the winter. This may be why the section in the middle were not doing very well.

We also have some Loganberry bushes set against a north facing fence on the other side of the garden. These produced a lot of fat berries last year but it was difficult to catch the berries before they shrivelled and went to seed. I’ll make more of an effort this time.